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Overview of Disability

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Denials for Disability

Appeals for denied claims

Disability Benefits from SSA

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Qualifications and How to Qualify

Working and Disability

Disability Awards and Notices

Disability Lawyers, Hiring Attorneys

Social Security List of Impairments

What Social Security considers disabling

Medical Evidence and Disability

Filing for Disability Benefits

Eligibility for Disability Benefits

SSD SSI Definitions



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Why anyone can afford to be represented on a disability claim




 
It occurred to me at one point (and it has reoccurred to me many times since then) that, in the U.S., one's ability to seek and derive justice, and one's treatment in the justice system itself, may be mediated by one's finance's, i.e. ability to pay upfront. Getting assistance on a traffic case is one example of this phenomenon. If you have the cash (and depending on the infraction and the state of your driving record, you may need considerably more cash), you can get an attorney and possibly walk away with a mild slap on the wrist. If you don't have the cash...hello points.

Fortunately, the social security disability and ssi disability system doesn't work this way. Representatives who handle disability claims (attorneys and non attorney representatives alike) are paid a fee that is equal to one-quarter of a claimant's backpay. And the total fee has a cap (the cap is $6000). Translation: what you pay to a disability lawyer or non attorney rep:

1. has nothing to do with your ongoing monthly benefits if you get approved.

2. only comes out of whatever backpay that the social security administration owes you, assuming you get approved.

3. can never exceed a defined maximum regardless of how much backpay that SSA owes you.

and most importantly----

4. is only paid if and when a case is won.

Number 4 on this list is the reason why anyone can be represented on a social security disability or SSI disability claim. A claimant does not have to fork over a huge amount of cash to find help and assistance on a disability claim.

Why do I bring this up? Because, unfortunately, some individuals will actually put off trying to find representation based solely on the assumption that they can't afford to hire a representative. And the truth is 180 degrees removed from this assumption. ANYONE can afford to hire someone for their SSD (social security disability) or SSI disability claim.

And thank goodness the system is this way. Because disability claimants already have quite a bit to contend with, generally including an inability at some point to meet their financial obligations (mortgage and utilities), an inability to get proper medical treatment (because of health insurance running out), and an inability to get prescriptions filled (perhaps the most awful aspect of having to wait so long on a claim).















Return to:  Social Security Disability Resource Center, or read answers to Questions





























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Information on the following topics can be found here: Social Security Disability Questions and in these subsections:

Frequently asked questions about getting Denied for Disability Benefits | FAQ on Disability Claim Representation | Info about Social Security Disability Approvals and Being Approved | FAQ on Social Security Disability SSI decisions | The SSD SSI Decision Process and what gets taken into consideration | Disability hearings before Judges | Medical exams for disability claims | Applying for Disability in various states | Selecting and hiring Disability Lawyers | Applying for Disability in North Carolina | Recent articles and answers to questions about SSD and SSI


These pages provide answers to basic questions about pursuing disability benefits

How and why to check Social Security Disability Status
Social Security Disability back pay
Non medical requirements for disability
Qualifying for disability, SSD SSI
When does social security consider you eligible for disability benefits?
Who qualifies for SSI?
Forms to complete when filing, applying for disability
How long does SSDI and SSI disability take to get?
Filing for disability with Depression
Can You Get Approved For SSI or SSD Benefits with a Mental Condition
How long for a disability judge to make a decision?
While you are in your disability interview
The SSD and SSI definition of disability
Filing for disability with carpal tunnel syndrome
Social Security Disability SSI and Fibromyalgia
Can you work if you get a disability check?
Disability application denied
File for disability, the application
How to get disability benefits
Conditions that get approved for disability
How to Appeal a disability claim denial from Social Security