Overview of Disability

Disability Back Pay

Requirements for Disability

Applications for disability

Tips and Advice for Disability Claims

How long does Disability take?

Winning Disability Benefits

Common Mistakes after a Denial

Mental Disability Benefits

Denials for Disability

Appeals for denied claims

Disability Benefits from SSA

SSI Benefits

Child Disability Benefits

Qualifications and How to Qualify

Working and Disability

Disability Awards and Notices

Disability Lawyers, Hiring Attorneys

Social Security List of Conditions

What Social Security considers disabling

Medical Evidence and Disability

Filing for Disability Benefits

Eligibility for Disability Benefits

SSD SSI Definitions



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More about filing for disability benefits in North Carolina




 
Continued from: Applying for NC disability benefits

3. While your application for disability in North Carolina will be taken at a local Social Security office, the actual decision itself will not be made by the Social Security office. The decision will be made by a disability examiner (I am a former North Carolina disability examiner myself) at NC DDS, which stands for North Carolina disability determination services.

4. DDS is the state-level agency where decisions on disability applications and reconsideration appeals are made. The examiner at DDS will gather medical records from the treatment sources that you listed when you filed your claim for disability.

Usually, the single largest delay on a claim will be the wait for medical records and this is why you want to make very sure when filing for disability benefits in North Carolina that you supply all your treatment sources, their full addresses, the names of all of your treating physicians, as well as all of your diagnosed conditions, and complaints, especially if pain is involved.

5. When the North Carolina disability examiner obtains your medical records, they must find at least some records that are not older than 90 days in order to make a decision on your case, and at the very least to make an approval on your claim.

If you have not been to a doctor in some time and, as a result, the examiner cannot locate recent records, then you will probably be sent to a CE, or what is commonly called a consultative examination.

This is a medical examination that is performed by an independent physician, or psychologist if the exam is mental in nature. The examination is scheduled by, and paid for, by the Social Security Administration. You must go to this examination if one is scheduled for you. If you do not attend a scheduled CE, your case can be denied for failure to cooperate.

6. The disability examiner who is assigned to work on your case will probably contact you at some point, through either the mail or by attempting to call you, to discuss either your medical treatment history, your work history, or you're ADLs, otherwise known as your activities of daily living.

You will want to provide in detail whatever information is requested of you. This will allow the disability examiner to make progress on your claim, and possibly make a better decision, I.e. an approval.

If the examiner send you a letter, be sure to respond within 10 days. If the examiner leaves a message for you, be sure to return the call. In either case, if the examiner attempts to contact you and you do not respond, there is the potential of your case being closed.

7. If you're denied on your initial claim, then you'll probably want to consider getting a disability lawyer or disability representative in North Carolina.

And here is the reason: if you get denied, your first appeal is something called a request for reconsideration. The request for reconsideration has approximately an 87% chance of denial. In most cases, the only reason for filing the reconsideration request is so that once you complete the reconsideration, which is almost guaranteed to be denied, then you can proceed to the next appeal level, the request for hearing before an administrative law judge.

At this disability hearing, you will certainly want to be represented. If you go to the hearing unrepresented, your chances of winning benefits may be lessened dramatically.

Therefore, if your initial claim is turned down, you should probably seek a representative to help you. Because most likely, you will wind up at a disability hearing, and at the hearing you will need representation, if for no other reason than to maximize your chances of winning disability benefits--particularly in light of the fact that getting to a disability hearing after requesting one can sometimes take between one and two years.















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Filing for NC disability benefits

Applying for Disability in North Carolina - How to apply, qualify, and meet filing requirements

Applying for NC disability benefits

More about filing for disability benefits in North Carolina

How to claim disability benefits in North Carolina

What happens on a disability application in North Carolina?

How long will it take to receive NC disability benefits if your application is approved?




Basic questions about disability benefits in North Carolina

How much can you receive in disability backpay in North Carolina?

How far back do you get disability benefits in North Carolina?

Can You Work and Collect Social Security Disability in North Carolina?

How to Get the Status on Your Social Security Disability Claim in North Carolina

How do I get help to win my disability claim in North Carolina?




The disability process in North Carolina

What condition or conditions qualifies for disability in North Carolina?

How long does it take to get through the disability system in North Carolina?

Is it hard to get disability benefits in North Carolina?

What are my chances of being approved for disability benefits in North Carolina?

How long does it take to receive North Carolina disability benefits after you are approved?

Disability determination services in North Carolina




Disability decisions in North Carolina

How long does it take for the disability decision in North Carolina?

How does the North Carolina Social Security disability determination process work?

Getting disability benefits in North Carolina

Getting denied for disability in North Carolina and filing appeals

What does getting disability benefits in North Carolina involve?

How to get on disability in North Carolina




NC Disability requirements and qualifications

Will I Qualify For Disability Benefits in North Carolina?

What is the criteria for disability benefits in North Carolina?

What are the disability qualifications in North Carolina?

Proving the requirements for disability in North Carolina

How do you meet the Disability qualifications in North Carolina?

SSI and Social Security Disability requirements in North Carolina

How do I Know If I Qualify For Disability in North Carolina?




Winning Disability benefits in NC

How do I win disability benefits in North Carolina?

Improving your chances of getting disability in North Carolina

How to improve the chances of winning a North Carolina disability hearing

Will an attorney or representative help me win North Carolina disability benefits?

Winning disability benefits in North Carolina




Mental Disability benefits in NC

Receiving disability for a mental condition in North Carolina

How do you receive benefits for a mental disability in North Carolina?

Getting approved for mental disability benefits in North Carolina





Disability awards and award notices in North Carolina

Getting a Social Security disability award in North Carolina

The Social Security disability award notice process in North Carolina

What affects how much time it takes to get a disability award in North Carolina?




Disability representation in North Carolina

Should I get a disability representative or lawyer in North Carolina?

Who can provide disability representation in North Carolina?

Hiring a Qualified Disability Lawyer in North Carolina

How do Disability Lawyers in North Carolina get paid their fees?

Denied for disability in North Carolina, should I get an attorney or representative?




Disability attorney fees in NC - paying your lawyer or representative

How does a disability lawyer or representative get paid in North Carolina?

How much does the fee cost for a disability attorney in North Carolina?

Do you pay your disability lawyer in North Carolina or does Social Security pay the fee?

Will your North Carolina disability lawyer charge you upfront for taking your case?

Will your NC disability attorney charge you for any expenses other than the main fee?




NC disability hearings

What kind of decision will you get at a disability hearing in North Carolina?

NC disability hearing - how long for a decision?

Do you have to go to a Social Security hearing in North Carolina to get approved for disability?

The disability hearing in North Carolina- things to keep in mind

How do you prepare for a disability hearing in North Carolina?