Topic Categories:


Social Security Disability Definitions

Social Security Disability and SSI Overview

The Requirements for Disability

Social Security Disability and SSI Applications

Tips and Advice for Disability Claims

How long does Disability take?

Common Mistakes after Receiving a Disability Denial

Disability Denials and Filing Appeals

Social Security Mental Disability Benefits

Disability Benefits offered through Social Security

Benefits through SSI disability

Disability Benefits for Children

Disability Qualifications and How to Qualify

Social Security Disability and Working

Winning your Disability Benefits

Social Security Back Pay and the disability award notice

Disability Lawyers and Hiring an Attorney

Social Security Disability SSI List of Conditions

What is considered a Disabling condition by Social Security?

Social Security Disability SSI and Medical Evidence

Filing for Disability Benefits

Eligibility for Disability Benefits


SSDRC authored by

Ask a question, get an answer

Mental Disability Benefits and What Social Security will Consider


How to prove you are disabled
and win disability benefits


 
While visiting an online disability forum discussing Social Security disability programs, I was surprised by how many individuals with mental impairments feel that the Social Security Administration does not consider their mental impairments as seriously as a physical impairment.

Does the Social Security Administration evaluate mental and physical impairments in the same way? The simple answer to this question is yes. Social Security evaluates all impairments in the same manner, consequently a mental condition may be considered just as disabling as a physical impairment by the Social Security Administration --- as long as the condition has prevented you from working for the past year or is projected to prevent you from working for a year.

What are some of the mental impairments that are considered to be disabling by the Social Security Administration? Depression, anxiety, post traumatic stress disorder, bipolar disorder, personality disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, schizophrenia, or any other mental impairment could be considered disabling by Social Security.

What does Social Security look at when evaluating a mental impairment? Social Security gathers all the medical records from the physicians, hospitals, and clinics that you have provided during your initial disability evaluation.

Additionally, they may request that you fill out informational forms, and they may contact your third party person (the person you listed on your initial application, who knows about your condition).

If you were not able to provide current medical information (within the last three months) when you filed your claim, or your medical information was insufficient to make a medical determination, you may have to attend a consultative examination to determine your current mental status.

What is a consultative exam? A consultative examination is an exam that is provided by a physician who is hired by Social Security to evaluate the severity of you mental condition.

Generally, it is better to have mental health treatment with your own psychologist, psychiatrist, or other mental health professional, than to depend upon an consultative examination with a Social Security consultative physician. Why so? Simply because it is more advantageous to have your decision based upon information gathered over a long period of time verus just one short visit to someone who has never treated you in the past.















Return to:  Social Security Disability Resource Center, or read answers to Questions





























Information on the following topics can be found here: Social Security Disability Questions

Social Security Disability SSI decisions | The Disability Decision Process and What gets taken into Consideration | Getting Denied for Disability Benefits | Questions about Social Security Disability Approvals and Being Approved | Social Security Disability Hearings | Social Security Medical Examinations | Social Security SSI Doctors | Social Security Disability Representation | Social Security Disability SSI Reviews