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Social Security Disability Definitions

Social Security Disability and SSI Overview

The Requirements for Disability

Social Security Disability and SSI Applications

Tips and Advice for Disability Claims

How long does Disability take?

Common Mistakes after Receiving a Disability Denial

Disability Denials and Filing Appeals

Social Security Mental Disability Benefits

Disability Benefits offered through Social Security

Benefits through SSI disability

Disability Benefits for Children

Disability Qualifications and How to Qualify

Social Security Disability and Working

Winning your Disability Benefits

Social Security Back Pay and the disability award notice

Disability Lawyers and Hiring an Attorney

Social Security Disability SSI List of Conditions

What is considered a Disabling condition by Social Security?

Social Security Disability SSI and Medical Evidence

Filing for Disability Benefits

Eligibility for Disability Benefits


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Does Social Security pay the Disability Attorney fee?


How to prove you are disabled
and win disability benefits


 
The Social Security Administration allows individuals who are filing for, or have filed for disability, to obtain representation to help them through the disability process. Who is allowed to represent individuals who are filing for disability? An individual who is filing for disability may potentially choose any person they wish to assist them with their disability case.

Usually, though, disability representatives are either attorneys, or non-attorney representatives who are often former employees of the social security administration. Attorneys and non-attorney representatives charge a fee for representation, which is limited by Social Security rules and regulations.

What do I mean by "charge a fee"? You may be thinking I do not have the money to hire a representative especially now that I am unable to work. Luckily, Social Security representatives do not charge their fees up front; instead there is a binding agreement between the representative and their client that stipulates what the representative can charge as a fee in the event that a disability case has been won (in other words, if the case is not won, there is no fee). This binding agreement is simply known as the fee agreement.

Currently, the standard fee agreement will include a statement that the representative is allowed to collect twenty five percent of any back benefits payable to the disabled individual up to maximum of $6000.00 dollars. Of course, representatives may charge for incidental expenses along with the standard fee, such as for the cost of obtaining medical records. However, these expenses should also be clearly defined in the fee agreement.















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Information on the following topics can be found here: Social Security Disability Questions

Social Security Disability SSI decisions | The Disability Decision Process and What gets taken into Consideration | Getting Denied for Disability Benefits | Questions about Social Security Disability Approvals and Being Approved | Social Security Disability Hearings | Social Security Medical Examinations | Social Security SSI Doctors | Social Security Disability Representation | Social Security Disability SSI Reviews