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Social Security Disability Definitions

Social Security Disability and SSI Overview

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How long does Disability take?

Common Mistakes after Receiving a Disability Denial

Disability Denials and Filing Appeals

Social Security Mental Disability Benefits

Disability Benefits offered through Social Security

Benefits through SSI disability

Disability Benefits for Children

Disability Qualifications and How to Qualify

Social Security Disability and Working

Winning your Disability Benefits

Social Security Back Pay and the disability award notice

Disability Lawyers and Hiring an Attorney

Social Security Disability SSI List of Conditions

What is considered a Disabling condition by Social Security?

Social Security Disability SSI and Medical Evidence

Filing for Disability Benefits

Eligibility for Disability Benefits


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Glaucoma, Social Security Disability, and Applying for Benefits




For more information on:   Social Security Disability and SSI Disability.



Glaucoma is not just one eye disorder but a group of eye diseases, which cause a loss of retinal ganglion cells. The loss of retinal ganglion cells results in optic neuropathy, and the loss of visual fields. The danger of glaucoma lies in its gradual loss of visual fields over a long period of time.

Once visual fields have been damaged they can never be recovered, consequently untreated glaucoma may lead to blindness. Studies indicate that African Americans and diabetics are about three times more likely to be affected by glaucoma. Asians are more likely to be affected by angle closure glaucoma. In fact, Inuits are twenty to forty times more likely than Caucasians to suffer from primary angle closure glaucoma. Even the use of drugs such as steroids can cause glaucoma.

Once of the most common myths about glaucoma is that although intraocular eye pressure is a risk factor for glaucoma, there is no certain threshold that will trigger glaucoma. For instance, some individuals who have relatively low eye pressures may have nerve damage, while others may have extremely high eye pressure with no nerve damage from glaucoma. Consequently, regular eye exams are necessary to detect increases in eye pressure, and an ophthalmologist should monitor elevated eye pressure to prevent permanent optic nerve damage.















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Information on the following topics can be found here: Social Security Disability Questions

Social Security Disability SSI decisions | The Disability Decision Process and What gets taken into Consideration | Getting Denied for Disability Benefits | Questions about Social Security Disability Approvals and Being Approved | Social Security Disability Hearings | Social Security Medical Examinations | Social Security SSI Doctors | Social Security Disability Representation | Social Security Disability SSI Reviews