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Getting a Disability Appeal sent in and on Time




 
In a prior post, I spoke about the frequent difficulty of getting in touch with the social security office and how this can pose a problem for individuals who need to file a social security disability appeal or SSI appeal. With that in mind, here's a short list of things to do following a disability denial, the goal being to avoid missing an appeal deadline.

1. As soon as you receive notification in the mail informing you that you that you have been denied for disability, call the social security office to request an appeal. If you were denied on a disability application, then the appeal will be a request for reconsideration. If you were denied on a reconsideration, the appeal will be a request for hearing.

2. If you don't have representation in the form of an attorney or a qualified non-attorney representative, then complete your appeal forms immediately after you receive them. You have two months time in which to do this (despite having sixty days, an extraordinary number of would-be appellants actually miss their disability appeal deadlines). But, to save processing time on your case, you shouldn't let any more time go by than necessary.

3. If you are represented, after you have called the social security office to request your appeal, contact your disability representative. Technically, you shouldn't have to do this because once the social security administration has been notified that you have a representative, they are required to send copies of all correspondence to your representative. However, that doesn't always happen. For this reason, it is always a safe idea to call your attorney when you receive a notice of denial, just in case they did not receive their copy. By doing this, you can help to ensure that a filing deadline is not missed.

Now, if you are represented, why should you bother calling the social security office to request your appeal? Shouldn't it be enough to simply contact your attorney and have them file the appeal? Technically, yes. However, redundancy is never a bad thing when it comes to the disability process. By contacting SSA and requesting a hearing, you'll get your request formally on record and you will be sent copies of your appeal paperwork. This will allow you to actually do your own appeal in the unlikely event that A) you discharge your disability attorney or B) you find out that your disability attorney has let your case fall through the cracks and has failed to submit an appeal.















Return to:  Social Security Disability Resource Center, or read answers to Questions





























Related pages:

How to file for disability in Wisconsin
Denied for disability length of illness
If I file for disability do I need pharmacy printouts?
Will disability go up at retirement age?
What medical conditions get you approved for disability?
Social Security Disability qualifications
How to claim disability benefits
The difference between Social Security disability and SSI
Filing for disability with migraines
Social Security Disability Temporary Benefits and Closed Periods
Will I qualify for disability with back pain, a bone spur, and bulging disks?
Would I eligible for SSD if I file now since I was disabled at the time I stopped working?
How do you Apply for SSI?
How to File for SSI
Eligible for Social Security Disability or SSI?



Information on the following topics can be found here: Social Security Disability Questions and in these subsections:

Frequently asked questions about getting Denied for Disability Benefits | FAQ on Disability Claim Representation | Info about Social Security Disability Approvals and Being Approved | FAQ on Social Security Disability SSI decisions | The SSD SSI Decision Process and what gets taken into consideration | Disability hearings before Judges | Medical exams for disability claims | Applying for Disability in various states | Selecting and hiring Disability Lawyers | Applying for Disability in North Carolina | Recent articles and answers to questions about SSD and SSI


These pages provide answers to basic questions about pursuing disability benefits

Social Security Disability attorneys and representatives
What is the status of your social security disability or SSI case
Rules and requirements to apply for disability
Will I qualify for disability?
Apply for disability for any medical condition
Steps and Tips for requesting a disability hearing
If your disability claim is approved or denied
Social Security Award letter for SSD, SSI
Temporary Social Security Disability SSI
Social Security Disability SSI reviews
How social security evaluates attention deficit
Filing for disability with Post polio syndrome
Tips for Getting Disability Approved
How far back Social Security will pay SSDI or SSI
SSI award notices are received by approved claimants
Winning and getting disability with a mental condition
Getting disability for rheumatoid arthritis
Can you work if you get Disability?
Who qualifies for SSI and how
How to file for disability and where to apply
Conditions that may qualify as disability
Denied on a disability application
Answering questions at a Social Security Disability hearing