Topic Categories:


Overview of Disability

Disability Back Pay

Requirements for Disability

Applications for disability

Tips and Advice for Disability Claims

How long does Disability take?

Winning Disability Benefits

Common Mistakes after a Denial

Mental Disability Benefits

Denials for Disability

Appeals for denied claims

Disability Benefits from SSA

SSI Benefits

Child Disability Benefits

Qualifications and How to Qualify

Working and Disability

Disability Awards and Notices

Disability Lawyers, Hiring Attorneys

Social Security List of Conditions

What Social Security considers disabling

Medical Evidence and Disability

Filing for Disability Benefits

Eligibility for Disability Benefits

SSD SSI Definitions



Ask a question, get an answer

Statistically, does an attorney make a substantial difference in a person's chances?




 
My answer: Yes. How have I arrived at this answer? From my own experience in disability claim representation and as a former disability claim examiner.

However, it's nice to see an actual statistic especially one that illustrates that the advantages of representation have been pretty good for quite a long time. Here's a statistic that was presented at a hearing before the social security subcomittee of the House Ways and Means committe several years ago:

"SSA's statistics...indicate that 74.9% of Title II disability claimants are represented by an attorney. Statistics for the same period indicate that the allowance rate at the hearing level for Title II disability claimants with representation is 63.6%; in contrast, the allowance rate for unrepresented Title II claimants is 40.1%."

To be clear, these are old stats. However, they did illustrate that representation represented in a nearly 50 percent increase in the chances of winning at a disability hearing. And that is something that is not likely to change regardless of the year.

There are many reasons to have representation but this page gives a few: Disability Lawyers, Medical Records, and Social Security Hearings.

Here is an excerpt from the page:

A disability attorney will obtain a copy of the claimant's file. This is done for several reasons: to review the file and to see why the claim was previously denied, as well as to observe the materials that were previously gathered by the disability examiner, such as substantiation of the claimant's work history and the medical evidence that was obtained from the claimant's doctors.

By reviewing the work history, the disability lawyer or representative can check to see if the claimant's past work was properly identified. Proper classification of past work (for instance, accounting clerk versus accountant, or light truck driver versus tractor-trailer-truck driver, etc) can absolutely make a difference in the decision reached on a claim.

By reviewing the medical records, the disability lawyer or representative can check to see if the evidence was evaluated properly. It may be that the claimant possesses greater physical or mental limitations than was considered to be the case by the disability examiner. If this is true, it may be that the claimant cannot return to a past job that was indicated by the disability examiner, or it may be that the claimant cannot do some type of other work that was indicated by the disability examiner.















Return to:  Social Security Disability Resource Center, or read answers to Questions





























Related pages:

Tips, how to apply for disability
Disability requirements, eligibility, criteria
How long does a request for a disability hearing appeal take?
Applying for Disability - How long does it take
Appealing a Denial with a Hearing Before an ALJ (Administrative Law Judge)
What to expect at a Social Security Disability medical exam
Will Social Security contact me about my Disability Hearing?
How many disability applications are approved?
Applying for Disability - Rules and Requirements
Disability requirements and how to file in California
What Conditions Qualify For Social Security Disability?



Information on the following topics can be found here: Social Security Disability Questions and in these subsections:

Frequently asked questions about getting Denied for Disability Benefits | FAQ on Disability Claim Representation | Info about Social Security Disability Approvals and Being Approved | FAQ on Social Security Disability SSI decisions | The SSD SSI Decision Process and what gets taken into consideration | Disability hearings before Judges | Medical exams for disability claims | Applying for Disability in various states | Selecting and hiring Disability Lawyers | Applying for Disability in North Carolina | Recent articles and answers to questions about SSD and SSI


These pages provide answers to basic questions about pursuing disability benefits

What Mental Problems Qualify for Disability?
Disability for a mental condition
Tips for Filing for disability
Financial Help Filing For Disability
Checklist for filing for disability, SSI or SSD
Qualifying for disability benefits, how to qualify for SSD or SSI
Filing a disability application: the steps
Disability award notice, how long it takes to get benefits
How to Apply for Disability - Where do I go?
What makes you eligible to get disability?
How to check my disability claim status?
Can a disability attorney speed up a disability case?
SSI disability Award Letter
How long to get approved for disability?
How to apply for disability benefits
How long does disability back pay take?
What are qualifications for getting disability?
What medical conditions can you file disability for?
Disability Lawyer help questions
Social Security Attorneys, Disability Representatives